Burying Ashes after Cremation. What you need to know.

Burying Ashes after Cremation. What you need to know.

Burying ashes is a popular way of demonstrating symbolic closure following cremation. For those who aren’t interested in keeping urns at home, the interment of ashes can be a practical option. Did you know that there are multiple options involved when arranging for the interment of ashes? Choosing a burial location, browsing between different cremation urns for ashes, and organizing a ceremony are all things to consider.

Burying Ashes in a Cemetery

Many people don’t realize that cremated ashes can be buried in a cemetery, and in most cases, the interment of ashes in a burial plot is much more affordable than traditional burial, since the plot doesn’t require as much space. Shared family plots offer the ability to bury ashes alongside deceased loved ones, which can be an extra source of confidence for families.

Cemetery photo. Article by Pulvis Art Urns

In addition to burial in a plot, some cemeteries offer the option of storing cremated ashes in a columbarium. Many columbarium spaces are leased for a set amount of time. A great benefit of this is that the ashes can remain in beautiful ceramic urns. Protected from the elements, these cremation urns for ashes can then be collected if the family decides later that they would like to keep the urn at home or commission the creation of specific keepsakes for ashes.

Set of artisan ceramic urns for ashes. Model "Light"

Set of artisan ceramic urns for ashes. Model "Light"

Community Memorial Gardens

There are also a number of communal memorial gardens that allow the interment or scattering of ashes. These typically offer a very natural setting with flowers, shrubs, trees, and reflection ponds. Community memorial gardens are unique in that the space is shared by many, and permission to access the space must be approved by the managing authorities.

Churchyard Interment

Traditionally, church parishes reserved space for the interment of ashes and traditional burials, either in a plot or columbarium. However, because of space limitations, this is not as common nowadays. It’s typical for religious leaders to require an official ceremony when using a churchyard facility. In addition, there may be additional rules on what types of cremation urns for ashes are allowed for interment in a churchyard. For example, handcrafted urns, some type of religious urns, artisan urns, or urns made from certain materials may be prohibited.

 

Artisan urns for ashes. "The Passage" set of urns

Artisan urns for ashes. "The Passage" set of urns 

 

Burying Ashes on Private Property

This is the interment option with the least amount of red tape, and it offers an endless amount of options, as you can use ceramic, wooden, biodegradable urns, or no urns at all. As long as you have the permission of the land owner, burying ashes on private property is allowed.

Selecting Cremation Urns for Ashes

Once you’ve decided where to bury the ashes, you can then think about what type of cremation urns for ashes you’re interested in. With a wide variety of urns for ashes on the market, it can be an enjoyable and meaningful process to find the perfect memorial for your loved one. Just keep in mind that different burial sites will have standards on what type of cremation urns for ashes are approved for interment.

Handcrafted urns for ashes by Pulvis Art Urns

Handcrafted urns for ashes by Pulvis Art Urns 

Organizing a Ceremony for the Interment of Ashes

Finally, organizing a ceremony for the burial can be an opportunity to personalize the experience and pay homage to your loved one. Whether reading a poem, playing a certain song, or gathering in a group prayer, ceremonies can be designed with as little or as much time needed to commemorate the moment.